Weight Loss & Toning = 80% Diet & 20% Training

You are probably hearing it more and more often that what you eat will help you further your fat loss goals more significantly than how often you work out.

"You can't out train a bad diet".

This is due to a number of reasons, including the fact that we burn far fewer calories than expected during a workout, and it’s incredibly easy to eat those calories right back after the gym. So is the 80% diet, 20% exercise really the way for fat loss?

Absolutely with no exceptions. 

To lose 1lb (0.45kg), you need to achieve a 3,500-calorie deficit. If you’re following the 80/20 rule, you ideally want to burn about 750 calories through exercise within the week and the rest comes from dietary changes.

To put this whole 80/20 rule into perspective you would need to run about 7-10 miles a day (depending on the individual) to burn that 1lb of fat. This is, not time practical for most of us, the average person can’t keep up this pace without suffering injury and significantly increasing their caloric intake in order to fuel them through the run and this amount of running is not going to be helpful when your looking to get that toned look. Follow the link for why just cardio wont make you toned. The Secret To a Toned Look.

This doesn't mean you just cut out exercise it offers so many health benefits and if looking toned or putting on some serious muscle is the ultimate goal it is essential.

 

Dynamic Stretching When & Why.

Dynamic Stretching is much more effective than static stretching when it comes to preparing for a training session and should be a big part of any warm up.

Dynamic Stretching involves working a joint or series of joints through a full range of motion, while simultaneously actively lengthening the muscles and preparing the muscles for the more intense exercise to follow.

Dynamic stretching can be anything from lunging, twisting, squatting, reaching pushing and pulling. As long as it at an appropriate intensity and uses the areas of the body that are to be used in the workout.

Another advantages of dynamic stretching include:

If you are interested in learning more about how to warm up in a dynamic way, contact me I am happy to help.

 

Static Stretching When & Why.

Static Stretching is used to stretch a muscle while the body is at rest. It is comprised of various techniques that gradually lengthen the muscle to an elongated position (to the point of discomfort) and holding that position for 30+ seconds.

Statically stretching a muscle before training has been shown to interfere with performance and augments the joint and can promote instability in the joint making the person more susceptible to injury. 

However stretching after a training session as part of a cool down to help improve flexibility can lengthen a tightened muscle. It can also help relive stress and tension.

Static Stretching should be done NOT BEFORE a training session but AFTER!

For your warm up I would start with Dynamic Stretching, stay tuned blog post to following on Dynamic Stretching.

 

What Load Should You Be Training At?

The load you should be working at for your lifts is very dependent upon your goals.

If your looking to build Power, Strength, gain some Muscle (hypertropy) or build Muscular Endurance they all require a certain load range based off your 1 Rep Max or Estimated 1 Rep Max. I will go though how do a 1 Rep Max test at a later date.

Below I have outlined the basics for Power, Strength, Hypertrophy and Muscular Endurance.

 

Note there are other considerations you must take into account when training such as training frequency and number of exercises in a session to maximise your progress.

If you are interested in a goal specific training programme get in contact am happy to help.

NPT Fitter than Yesterday

www.nfspt.com

Exercise Order & Why its Important.

Although it is fairly obvious if you have training experience, studies that analyse the effects of exercise order on training performance show that volume (total reps performed) is greater when an exercise is placed at the beginning of a training session.

Since compound exercises engage multiple muscle groups and provide the greatest overload, they should generally be prioritised over isolation exercises and performed at the beginning of your training session to get the best results.

For example

That said, if you consider an isolation exercise important for meeting your individual training needs (like bringing up a lagging body part), performing this exercise before your compound lifts can be useful.

If your interested in progressive full body training programme designed for you get in contact I do online training packages.

NPT Stronger than Yesterday

www.nfspt.com